Cain Pauses to Consider Lybia

Goose Nissley —  November 14, 2011 — 1 Comment

Herman Cain’s response to a question on Libya in a sit down with the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel is buzzing around the webs with zeal this eve. Particularly the profoundly long pause at the outset of his answer. Watch below…

Obviously you don’t see this kind of thing very often from a would be President! Complete with what Hillary Clinton might term an effort to apply a sort of reset button! I guess this is the week for rather epic moments

Now this isn’t an easy thing the candidates go through subjecting themselves to tough and detailed questions from ambitious and prickly reporters and interviewers day after day – many of whom would love nothing more than to create an embarrassing You Tube clip for you. But Mr. Cain looks pretty rough here. He very much reminds me of a high school speech contestant struggling to throw together something that might sound credible.

Setting aside the beginning interlude – what I found particularly interesting in Cain’s response was his refusal to take much of a position at all. If this was Mitt Romney saying he wasn’t criticizing President Obama specifically right then and there – there’d be like 83 bloggers from Hot Air to the Daily Caller writing whole novels on his lack of Conservative fervor because he wouldn’t take a position. But I guess we’re good with Herman’s refusal to do so? Eh Roger Ailes?!

Goose Nissley

Posts

Raised on Eastern Montana's wind-swept prairies, love for small town life & simplicity were kindled early in his life. During the day, he does radio in Minnesota's Twin Cities. Reached 19 before realizing he could close his mouth & brush his teeth.

One response to Cain Pauses to Consider Lybia

  1. I for one am not interested in voting for a president based on their knowledge of current events, culture, history or science. Though a well rounded candidate should have understanding of these areas, I am most interested in a candidate‚Äôs judgment and wisdom. It is typical for people to become distracted by gaffes that people in the spotlight make, but I do not care if the President cannot say “corpsman,” doesn’t know where Hawaii is, and occasionally creates new words, if he excercises sound judgement and moral constraint.

    I judge a candidate on their moral soundness, leadership, and wisdom. With this solid base, they will surround themselves with knowledgeable advisors and can make the critical decisions about the future of this country.

Leave a Reply